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Acker Family

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
Philip Jacob Acker, the ancestor of this family, was born in 1696 in Germany and landed at Philadelphia on September 25, 1732, on the ship "Loyal Judith," with his brother Henry Acker. He was then thirty-six years of age. He settled in the district, which at that time was called Macungie in Bucks county, now Upper Macungie township, Lehigh county, about six miles west of Allentown, on what is now the Koch farm, on the south side of the public road leading from Allentown to Fogelsville, located several miles east of Fogelsville and probably one mile east of Chapman's Station on the Catasauqua and Fogelsville Railroad.

Philip Jacob Acker was naturalized at the session of the Supreme Court in Philadelphia on September 27, 1743, and in 1745 he was one of the organizers of the Ziegel Church, located in Weisenburg township. On March 30-31, 1757, David Schultze surveyed land for Philip Jacob Acker in Macungie, as also for Dewald Koontz, Christian Heisler, Adam Fisher and Conrad Pien (See Perkiomen Region Vol. 3, Page 91). On January 11, 1759, Philip Jacob Acker was granted land adjoining his other land and that of Christian Heisler in Macungie township. In 1762 he was assessed £10 in Macungie township.

Philip Jacob Acker and his wife Anna Maria had one son, Jacob Acker, who was born July 25, 1736.

On March 24, 1786, Jacob Acker purchased by assignment from William Green, of Reading, Berks county, for the sum of £120 in gold and silver money, 170 acres of land in Weisenburg township, Lehigh county, formerly owned by George Wise, of Germantown. This land is located five or six miles from the original Acker farm in Macungie township, and about six miles northeast of the Ziegel church. It is said the reason of the further removal from the fertile soil of Macungie to the hills of Weisenburg was the lack of water in the former lands, which was abundant, and still is abundant, in Weisenburg. The Acker farm in Weisenburg remained in the family until about 1870, when it was sold to a Mr. Grim. It is now owned by Mr. Grim's son.

In 1781 Jacob Acker was assessed for the old property in Macungie, but in the next published assessment in 1812 no Acker property was assessed in Macungie, but in that same year Daniel, Michael and George Acker were assessed in Weisenburg. These three individuals were sons of Jacob Acker, who had purchased the Weisenburg property in 1786 and who at this time was seventy-six years of age, and, no doubt, had transferred his property to his sons.

Jacob Acker's name is recorded as a Private in Captain Trexler's Company under command of Col. George Breinig of the Northampton Militia, May 14, 1788. (Page in, Vol. 8, 5th Series of Pennsylvania Archives.) The names of Christian Acker and Jacob Acker, Junior, also appear in this muster roll. Jacob Acker, as well as his father, Philip Jacob Acker, was buried at Ziegel church. The tombstone of Jacob Acker, a slate slab, contains the following iscription: "Here rests in God, Jacob Acker, who was born July 25, 1736, had lived in the matrimonial state with Eberhartine Heisler for 47 years, to whom nine children were born, eight sons and one daughter." The rest of the inscription was defaced.

Eberhartine Acker survived her husband and lived to an old age in the small house on the old Acker farm in Weisenburg. Jacob Acker married Eberhartine Heisler, daughter of Christian Heisler and his wife Eva Elizabeth. They had these children: Christian, born December 25, 1755; Philip Jacob, born August 30, 1757; John Leonhart, born September 22, 1752; George Henry, born December 10, 1761; Daniel; Michael, born December 25, 1766; John, and two daughters.

Christian Acker was a soldier in the Continental Army. He and his wife Elizabeth had a son George Henry, born November 15, 1782.

Philip Jacob Acker is said to have lost his life in the service of the Continental Army. George Acker was at one time a member of the State Legislature of Pennsylvania. His descendants settled in Longswamp, Berks county.

Daniel Acker married May 21, 1793, Margaretha Schmidt. He owned the old Weisenburg farm. One of his sons, Joseph D., lived in West Chester, Pa. The other of "his sons, George Acker, had a large farm, part of which was included in the limits of Allentown. He married Elizabeth, widow of Daniel Knauss, nee Frey, daughter of John Frey. She was born Oct. 28, 1795, and died March 9, 1855. They had five children: Abbie, who married a Mr. Foley; Reuben; George, a Civil War soldier, who died unmarried; Mary, married to Phaon Haas; and Sarah, married to Levi Kuhns.

Reuben Acker, the eldest son of George and Elizabeth (Frey) Acker, was born in Allentown, in 1825. He spent his youth upon his father's farm and his early education was limited to the opportunities of a farmer's boy in the common schools. During the entire period of his active life he was a hard worker at whatever his hands found to do. Mr. Acker, in 1847, at the age of twenty-two years, left home to seek his fortune, with a capital of one dollar and fifty cents. He went to New York City, from thence to Ohio, working at various employments, but always managing to save some of his earnings. In 1852 he, with others, set out with an ox team for California, and in just six months they reached their goal. Mr. Acker found work in Alameda county on a farm at eighty-five dollars per month "and found." He remained five years and with his savings embarked in business for himself. His first year's profit was $2,400; that of the second year about the same. He then engaged in buying and selling cattle, and continued in this business for upwards of eight years, meeting with fair success. In 1864 Mr. Acker returned to Allentown and purchased his parents' old homestead of one hundred and twenty-six acres, near Allentown, where he settled in 1865. In vain did he offer to give one-half his land to any person who would erect for him suitable buildings on the remaining half of the tract. This proved to be a blessing in disguise, as the growth of the city of Allentown extended to his property and its lands became populous and valuable, from all of which he derived a substantial benefit. He watched this growth and contributed his full share in promoting the interests of Allentown. After retiring from active farm work, he resided at 1125 Turner street, Allentown, giving considerable attention to real estate. In Sept. 1905, in company with his son-in-law, H. W. Haines, he went to the Pacific coast to visit the places in which he had formerly made his home. While on this visit he died, Oct. 5, 1905, and his remains were brought to Allentown and interred in Union cemetery. In politics he was a Democrat, always taking an interest in the city's political welfare and its institutions. He was a consistent member of the Lutheran Church. Reuben Acker married, in California, Sarah Andrews, born Jan. 17, 1838, died Aug. 19, 1896, and who was interred in Union cemetery by the side of her husband. Their children were: Joseph John, born June 7, 1868, died Nov. 12, 1885; Ida, born Dec. 16, 1869, died Feb. 15, 1880; Sarah E., born May 15, 1871, married Oscar D. Knauss; Agnes, born Jan. 9, 1873, baptized Oct. 2, 1873, married Harvey W. Haines. Issue: Ruth A., born March 15, 1895, who married, June 18, 1913. Claude U. Keck, of Allentown, and Helen Agnes Haines, born Dec. 3, 1903. Mrs. Agnes Haines has her home at 1613 Chew street, Allentown; Martha D., born Oct. 1, 1875, married Edward W. Lewis. Issue: Reuben, May, George and John Lewis.

A daughter of Jacob Acker married Michael Reichert and both are buried in Milton, Pa. Their descendants are: Rev. George W. Richards, D.D., of the Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church at Lancaster, and his son, Joseph W. Richards; Mary Louisa, wife of Dr. James S. Smith, of Allentown, and Cora D. Richards, who was a school teacher, married in 1914, Mr. C. J. Burger, of Allentown.

Another child of Jacob Acker, probably a daughter, was born August 3, 1771.

Michael Acker, youngest son of Jacob Acker, was born December 5, 1766. The sponsors were Christian Acker and Anna Maria, daughter of Adam Heberly, both single. He was born in Macungie and died at the age of 44 years. He married Maria Klein, daughter of Peter Klein, of Weisenberg and his wife, Margaret Stettler. They had six children, four sons and two daughters, namely:

Jonathan, the oldest son, married Sallie Schaeffer and died at the age of 62 years. They had a number of children, all of whom are now dead.

Elizabeth Acker, born September 6, 1790, married John Dennis. They lived in Snyder county, Pa. Mrs. Dennis died at the advanced age of over 88 years.

Jacob Acker lived and died in Upper Macungie. He married a Miss Feldhof. They had sons and daughters. Among them were: Jacob, of Allentown; and Caroline, who married a Mr. Kuhns, of Atchison.

Henry Acker married Sallie Hartman. They settled in Ohio, about twelve miles west of Akron. He died at the age of 84 years and had sons and daughters.

Polly married Jacob Reinbold. He died at the age of 97 years, and she died at the age of 78 years. They moved on the south side of South Mountain, near Emaus. They had one daughter, Elizabeth, who married Solomon Reinbold and had sons and daughters. Mr. Reinbold died a number of years ago at the age of 58 years. Mrs. Reinbold died several years ago at an advanced age.

Daniel Acker, was born in Weisenburg, April 20, 1792, and died at his home near Wescoesville, March 1, 1844, at the age of 52 years, from the result of an accident. He married, in 1818, Christiana Wuchter, a daughter of Martin Wuchter, of Heidelberg township, and had five sons and two daughters:

A daughter who died in her infancy.

Edwin, born August 29, 1821, who married Eliza Dorney, of Whitehall. They resided in Lehigh county for some years, but later removed to New York City, where he enlisted as a soldier in the Union Army in the Rebellion, and served as corporal in a New York heavy artillery regiment. After the war he lived in the State of Kansas, and died at the age of 79 years and is buried in Oswatomie, Kansas. They had sons and daughters. The oldest son, William Henry Harrison Acker, was also a soldier in the Union Army during the war with the South. He resides in East Texas, Lehigh county. Their children are one son and two daughters. One daughter, Mrs. Miller, resides near New York City. One daughter and one son reside in Eastern Kansas, not far from Kansas City.

Stephen, born September 3, 1823, died March 12, 1800, at the age of 76 years. He resided in East Texas, Lehigh county. He was a popular school teacher and a well known surveyor and also served as Alderman and Notary for a number of years. For accuracy and honesty in business transactions he was highly esteemed. He was a faithful member of the Evangelical Association from his early years until his death. He married Helen Schumaker and had three sons and one daughter: Cyrus, of East Texas; Elmer, who married a Miss Sting, of Philadelphia, and had one daughter, Edna. They reside in Pen Argyl, Pa.; Curtis, of Bethlehem, who married a Miss Miller, who died several years ago. They had one son, Ira, who is married and resides in Bethlehem, and two daughters, Lydia H., who resides with her grand-uncle, Rev. James D. Acker, in Philadelphia, and Ada, who resides with her aunt, Sadie H. Acker, in East Texas. Sadie, only daughter of Stephen Acker, resides at East Texas.

Alvin Acker was born March 26, 1826, and died in Bellevue, Kan., June 23, 1904, at the age of 78 years. In 1848, in company with John Joseph Woodring, he walked from Lehigh county, Pa., to Seneca county, Ohio, and settled near Flat Rock, where he married Miss Sarah Casebier. They had two sons: Charles Fremont and James H. The mother died when the boys were quite young. He was married a second time to Miranda Engel. He followed the carpenter trade and farming. In 1869 they moved to Donophan county, Kas., purchasing a quarter section of the wild prairie land and by their industry and thrift procured a section of 640 acres of the best soil west of the Missouri. He is buried a short distance from their home in the Bellevue cemetery. His two sons reside close to the old homestead and are both farmers.

Mary Ann Acker was born October 22, 1828.

She married John Joseph Wood ring, who died in 1908. Mrs. Woodring died in October, 1912. They had seven children: Wilson J., of Allentown, who married Catharine Kern, and has two children; Rev. James D., formerly president of Albright College at Myerstown, who died in 1909; Ella, of Allentown; Morrison J., of Philadelphia; Celesta, married William McCauley; Walter L., of Allentown, and Rev. Edwin S. Woodring, pastor of Seibert United Evangelical church, Allentown.

Rev. James Daniel Acker, one of the best known Evangelical ministers of Pennsylvania, was born Dec. 14, 1830, in Lower Macungie township, one mile west of the little town of East Texas, on the banks of the Little Lehigh river. He was thirteen years of age when his father died and he afterwards lived with farmers. On Sept. 24, 1850, he came to Philadelphia. There were no railroads then from Allentown, but they had daily stage communication. He started at seven o'clock in the morning and arrived at Philadelphia at four o'clock in the afternoon. In his own words he stated: "I had only a few dollars in my possession when I came to the city, depending on finding employment, in which I was not disappointed. I also brought a certificate of church membership which I prized above the few dollars cash in my possession. In a few days I found a church home, and attended weekday evening prayer-meetings. Before the first Sabbath, I had found a young lady in the prayer-meeting, namely, Miss Emeline Kinsley, of Philadelphia, and on December 23, 1852, we started to "travel together" and we still travel side by side on the same road. In 1864 I became a commercial traveler, extending my trips westward to Omaha, Neb., northwest to Minneapolis, Minn., and southward to Memphis, Tenn. I was then young and vigorous, I am now 84 years old and great changes have taken place. Later in years I entered the ministry and at this writing I am still active in the work." Upon his arrival in Philadelphia in 1850 Mr. Acker united with the first church of the Evangelical Association in that city. Later he became one of the prime movers in the establishment of an English mission of that denomination on Darien street, popularly known as "Little Heaven." Later this congregation built a fine church on Eighth street, near Girard avenue.

For years Mr. Acker felt the call to the ministry, to which call he finally yielded and was ordained by the church of his choice. He served a number of important charges in the Evangelical Association and later in the United Evangelical Church, including appointments in Germantown and Philadelphia.

Although no longer serving a church in the active ministry, his services are still in demand and nearly every Sunday finds him actively engaged in preaching the Gospel.

Mr. and Mrs. James D. Acker had the following children:

Emma Laura Acker, born October 26, 1853, married Cornelius S. Klein, who has been in the employ of the Finley Acker Company from the earliest days of its organization. They reside in Germantown and had three daughters: Edith S., married Arthur Kingman, of Newark, N. J.; Mary E., married William Rutter Jenks, of Germantown, and Laura, who died in infancy.

Durbin Stephen Acker, born December 25,1854. He married Mary Radey, who died in 1912. He is an officer and member of the Finley Acker Company, resides in Philadelphia, and has three children. The eldest, John Henry Rader Acker, is a member of the law firm of Conlen, Brinton and Acker. He married Miss Crozer and has one child. The second, James Durbin Acker, of West Philadelphia, holds a position in the Finley Acker Company. He married Retta Smith. Helen Radey Acker, the youngest, married Samuel Woolford, an attorney of Philadelphia, and has one child.

Finley Acker was born* Nov. 8, 1857, in Lower Macungie township, Lehigh county. His early education was obtained in the public schools, supplemented by night school and business college training. He made his first step in the business world as a cash boy in the employ of Curwen, Stoddard & Co. After promotion to clerk, salesman and assistant buyer, at the age of twenty-one he opened a retail tea and coffee store on Eighth street, above Arch, in Philadelphia, which, with the co-operation of his brothers, he developed in a manner so different from conventional grocery methods as to attract the attention of the trade. His success in this business led him to extend the business to other mercantile lines. He later opened stores at Twelfth and Chestnut streets and Twelfth and Market streets, Philadelphia, and one in New York City. Because of his activities in the interest of pure food, he became treasurer of the first National Pure Food Show in this country, held at Washington in 1887.

He was actively concerned in the citizens movement to require the street passenger railway companies to pay a fair price for the privilege of installing the trolley system in Philadelphia, in consequence of which effort the railway companies were required to repave many streets with improved paving. When the question of protecting the interests of the public regarding the gas lease and the traction system, upon the basis of insuring the maximum benefits to the public after the payment of reasonable returns upon money actually invested, was brought forth, he stood for the interest of the people as a whole as distinguished from any favored interest. His thorough analyses of these two problems were made in a pamphlet, entitled "Eminent Respectability," and in an address, entitled "The Rights of the People and the Rights of Investors in Philadelphia Street Railways," which address was delivered before the City Club in a joint debate with George H. Earle. He was chairman of the postal committee of the Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce and of the National Board of Trade, for a number of years. As chairman of the banking and currency committee of the Chamber of Commerce, he appeared several times before congressional committees and his arguments for postal and currency reform were quoted by speakers in all sections of the United States.

Mr. Acker was a life long Republican. He was an active member of the "Committee of Fifty," and one of the organizers of the Municipal League. He was chairman of the executive committee of Independent Republicans when Robert E. Pattison was elected Governor over George W. Delamater. He was one of the organizers of the Midland Pennsylvania Railroad Company and a member of the Union League, the City Club, Poor Richard Club, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Penna. Society of Sons of the Revolution and Penna. Society of New York.

He married, in 1883, Elizabeth Boyle Cadmus. Mr. Acker died at his residence, 4943 Rubicam avenue, Germantown, on February 12, 1913.

Ellen Louisa Acker, born January 15, and died in June, 1861.

Abraham Lincoln Acker was born Feb. 25, 1865. He was named the same hour when the martyred president, Abraham Lincoln, died. He married Emily Rebecca Focht, and has one daughter, Emily Lincoln. They reside in Tioga, Philadelphia. For a while he was a member of Mayor Weaver's cabinet, but preferred to return to his position as a member and officer of the Finley Acker Company. In 1911 he was elected to the office of sheriff of the city and County of Philadelphia on the Republican ticket, in which capacity he is serving his native city at this writing.

Harrison Benjamin, the youngest son of Daniel Acker, was born October 9, 1838, in Salisbury, Lehigh county, three miles southwest of Allentown. He died at his home in Bellevue, Ohio, September 14, 1903, at the age of nearly 65 years. He married Eliza Amanda Hiskey of Lower Macungie township. In 1858 they moved to Flat Rock, Seneca county, Ohio. He followed the carpenter trade until the breaking of the Rebellion, when he enlisted as a soldier in the Thirty-Fourth Ohio Regiment. While in service he was stricken with typhoid-pneumonia and not expected to recover. His brother Alvin of Flat Rock, Ohio, went to the Army Hospital and nursed him, and his life was spared. The Doctor told him if he would take the best of care of himself, he might live for a few years. He followed this advice and lived forty years longer. He moved to Bellevue, Ohio, where he became highly respected by all classes. For a number of years he was treasurer of the city. He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. (The compiler of these records is greatly indebted to him for much contained in these records.) They had five children:

Celesta Maria, a daughter of Harrison B. Acker, married George W. Barber. They reside in Bellevue, Ohio; their son is Ralph Acker Barber.

Clara Elmira Lavinia is another daughter of Harrison B. Acker. She married George Heter; they reside near Peabody, Kan. They have one son, Harry John, and a daughter named Georgia.

Hattie Celinda, another daughter of Harrison B. Acker, married Alexander Mittenbuhler. Their surviving children are Charles Dell Mittenbuhler and a daughter named Ruby. Both are married. They also had a son Durbin Acker Mittenbuhler, who died when quite young. They now reside in Cleveland, Ohio.

Delia Amanda, another daughter of Harrison B. Acker, married Mr. Tyson, of Bellevue, Ohio. She died on September 23, 1899. Their only son is Harry Acker Tyson.

Mrs. Harrison B. Acker died at their home in Bellevue, May 11, 1902, and with her husband is buried in the Bellevue cemetery.

Christiana, wife of Daniel Acker, and daughter of Martin Wuchter, was married after the death of Mr. Acker, to John W. Woodring. They had one daughter, Ella, who marreid Moses Diefenderfer, of Bethlehem, Pa. They have two sons, Victor and Heeber, both married.

Jesse Acker was born in Weisenberg township, May 1, 1807, and settled at Rittersville during the 40's, where he followed the trade of a shoe maker until his death on February 23, 1880, in his 73 year. His wife, Maria Heinrich, was born February 5, 1803, died March 30, 1880, in her 78th year. Their children follow: Cornelius; John, who lived in Hanover; Mary, wife of Joseph Honshue; Polly, wife of William Hoehle; Amelia, wife of Aaron Nicholas, and Harrison, who died young. Mr. Acker had two brothers, John and Nathan, and a sister Catharine.

Cornelius Acker, deceased, was born in Weisenberg township, November 22, 1840. When a boy he came to Hanover with his parents and was reared upon the farm. Later he was em- ployed for seven years by Charles Ritter at Rittersville and worked in the store and farm. For more than seven years he was a bar-clerk for J. Frank Reichard and later was employed in the rolling mill in Allentown and also in the Bethlehem Steel Company. He was county commissioner for three years, tax collector for five years and was prominent as a Democratic politician. He always lived in Rittersville and died there January 8, 1906. He was an active member of che Lutheran Church and served as deacon and elder and for twenty years was its treasurer. He also served as trustee and the treasurer of the cemetery association for many years. He was a soldier in the Civil war and had three enlistments.

In 1865 he married Mary Hoehle, who resides on the homestead, which Mr. Acker built in 1894. They have these children: William A., who married (first) Cora Knoll, deceased, and (second) Lizzie Hettinger; Ellen J., who married Marcus Stehley, deceased, and second Charles G. Breisch; Emma M., died aged 23 years, and Harvey C, married to Minnie Troxell and resides at Bethlehem.

Jonas Acker was born in Weisenberg township October 9, 1829, and had a large farm near Grimville. He removed to Ruhetown, North Whitehall township, where he had a 43-acre farm. He conducted the latter farm until 1873 and then moved to Hoffmansville, where he followed the trade of a carpenter and worked in ore mines. He died at the residence of his son, George March 15, 1910, aged 80 years, 5 months and 6 days, and is buried at the Jordan Lutheran church. His wife, Sarah, nee Adam, was born January 26, 1828, and died June 28, 1893, aged 64 years, 11 months and 2 days. They had these children: Rosa, who died young; Alfred, who died young: Catharine, who married Samuel Dries; Oliver; Osville; William; Charles, born May 5, 1862, died May 30, 1909; and George A.

George A. Acker, a son of Jonas and Sarah Acker, is the organist and chorister of the Jordan churches in South Whitehall township. He was born in Weisenberg township, July 30, 1870, and attended the public school, and was reared upon the farm. In 1895 he began farming at Schnecksville and in 1900 he accepted his position as organist of the Jordan churches which he has served ever since. He resides at the church and operates the farm of the Lutheran congregation, consisting of 30 acres. As a Democrat he served the office of constable since 1907.

In 1897 he was married to Kate DeLong, daughter of William and Sarah (Scheirer) DeLong. Their children are: Lucian C. and Elsie M.

Lewis A. Acker, a member of the firm of Joseph A. Best & Co., a leading stove store at Allentown, was born in Weisenberg township, March 26, 1874. He attended the public schools and the American Commercial School, from which he was graduated in 1895. He was then employed as bookkeeper for Neff & Best, continuing in their employ until March, 1901, when he became associated with Joseph A. Best under the firm name of Joseph A. Best & Co. The business is located at 440 North Tenth street.

He was married June 16, 1901, to Mame R. Kemmerer, daughter of Irvin F. Kemmerer, of Allentown. Their children are: Ruth S. A.; Paul K., who died in his second year; Lewis D.; and Grace K. Mr. Acker and his family are members of Dubbs Memorial church in which Mr. Acker served as a deacon. The family resides at 610 North Tenth street, Allentown.

Joseph Arndt, grandfather of Lewis A. Acker, was born near Lenhartsville, Berks county. He was a shoemaker and always lived in the vicinity of Lenhartsville. He is buried at Zion's church, Windsor township. His wife was a Miss Zettelmoyer, who came from that section. Their children are: Daniel, Masilla, wife of Daniel Acker; Emma, Catharine, Wilson, Lizzie, Joseph, and Alfred.

Acker, Wilson A.

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
Wilson Allen Acker, hotel proprietor at Hynemansville for twenty-one years, was born June 3, 1861, in Weisenberg township, where he was educated in the township school and brought up on his father's farm and he assisted his father until he was thirty-one years old. He then purchased the oldest established hotel stand in the county of Lehigh, at Hynemansville, including twenty-eight acres, and he has carried on the business tgoether with farming operations in a successful manner until the present time. He has been recognized by the numerous patrons of the stand for his courteous entertainment.

In 1889, he was married to Alameda H. Schmick, daughter of Henry, farmer of Lowhill township, and they have two children: Martha, m. Frederick Sechler, and Stella, m. Harvey Heffner.

His father, Allen Acker, was born and brought up on a farm in Weisenberg township, and he was engaged at farming until his decease in 1898. He was married to Mary Greenawald, a daughter of Daniel, farmer, of Wessnersville, in Greenwich township, Berks county, and they had twelve children: Franklin, m. Emma Werley; Wilson A.; Sarah, m. Edgar Woodring; Emma, m. Wilbur Stettler; Levi, m. Anna Creitz; John, m. Barbara Frey; Alvin, m. Cora Werley; and five died young.

Joseph Acker, a farmer of Weisenberg, was his grandfather. He was married to Mary Neff, and they had three children: Elizabeth, m. Henry Metzger; Anna, m. Mahlon Luther; and Allen.

Ackerman Family

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
Jacob Ackerman lived along Hosensack creek, near East Greenville, in Montgomery county, and there he died in 1851, aged 50 years and is buried at the Goshenhoppen church, having been a Reformed member of it. He was a farmer and owned and occupied his own farm.

He married Caroline Woodring, being her third husband. They had three children, viz.: Edmond, Henry, and Jacob.

By her first husband, a Kurtz, she had one son and a daughter.

By her second husband, a Zeller, she had an only child who died small; and by her fourth husband, a Snyder, she had no issue.

Edmond Ackerman, son of Jacob, was born in Montgomery county, in 1846. He removed to District township, Berks county, in 1868, and was a laborer, living near Landis Store, for eight years. His wife Mary S. Minner, is a daughter of Jonas Minner, who was a justice of the peace in District township for 45 successive years, dying in his 91st year of age. They had an only son, Jonas M., whose history follows. In the spring of 1906 Mrs. Ackerman settled in her own home at No. 629 Cedar street, Allentown, where her son, Jonas, tenderly supplies all her desires.

Jonas M. Ackerman, of Allentown, is a cement contractor, residing at 807 North Seventh street. He is a member of the firm of Schaeffer and Ackerman, and was born in District township, Berks county, Nov. 3, 1873. When he was a young man he was employed in the creamery at Landisville for five years and later he learned the plastering trade and cement work at Pottstown for three years. In 1898 he came to Allentown and worked as a journeyman for two years and then he formed a partnership with J. A. Schaeffer and engaged in the cement and plaster contracting business. The firm has been very successful and employ as many as forty men. Some of the work performed by them are the concrete floor in the State Hospital, at Rittersville; also all the grating and cement paving at Clifford Park, one of the suburbs of Allentown; also all the re-inforced work of Allentown hospital, as well as the floors and roofs and all the plastering in the first buildings. The firm also built the reinforced bridge at Ruchsville, this county, and upwards of fifty houses in Allentown. Mr. Ackerman was the leader of the Landisville band while living in District township, and since the year 1900 he plays with the Pioneer band of Allentown. In politics he is a Democrat and in 1907 he was elected a member of common council from the Tenth ward, serving one term.

On April 29, 1893, he married Sarah Schneck, a daughter of James and Hettie (Sterner) Schneck, of Longswamp township, who was killed in the ore mines in the year 1877. Mr. and Mrs. Ackerman have these children: Viola; Grace; Ralph; Robert; Harvey, and Verna.

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Stephen and Fietta (Griffith) Ackerman, of Upper Milford township, lived to the age of 75 and 82 years respectively, and they are buried at Scheetz's church. They had issue: Mary, Amelia, Diana, Sarah, Hannah, Amanda, Dora, Ida, Henry, Frank, John, and Percival Ackerman. John Ackerman, the third son of Stephen and Fietta (Griffith) Ackerman, was born December 6, 1860, and was reared on the farm and remained thirty years on the homestead, consisting of 80 acres. He was educated in the public schools and is a member and trustee of the Mennonite church in Upper Milford township.

He married Kate Shelly, daughter of Levi and Mary (Bliem) Shelly, whose sketch appears elsewhere in these volumes. They had a daughter, Edna, who is married to Walter Gehman. They have a daughter, Marion Gehman.

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Arthur W. Ackerman, a wholesale liquor dealer at Slatington, was born in Allentown, July 13th 1873. He received his education in the public schools of Allentown and the American Commercial School. After finishing his commercial course he worked for Keck Bros., as bookkeeper, and from 1905 to April, 1910, he was employed as clerk by the Bethlehem Liquor and Bottling Company.

In the spring of 1910 he purchased the stock and good will of Frank Medlar, at Slatington, and has conducted this business ever since. He is a member of the Woodmen of the World at Slatington; and the Knights of the Golden Eagle. His place of business is at No. 261 Lower Main street, Slatington.


Agsten, G. H.

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
Gotthardt H. Agsten was born in South Bethlehem, Jan. 18, 1885. He was educated in the common schools until 13 years old, when he was employed on the farm of Edward Lambert, of Iron Hill, for 3 years. The following two years were spent at Pittsburgh where he learned the trade of pattern-making. He returned to South Bethlehem, where he was employed as carpenter foreman in the Wm. Mack factory. He removed to Hillsdale, Michigan, where he worked at his trade for three years, and returned to South Bethlehem, where he continued at his trade until the spring of 1913. He had since engaged in general farming. Previous to removing to the farm, he built a fine home on the Lehigh mountain in Salisbury township, which he sold since, living in the home he purchased with the farm. Mr. Agsten was a member of the Lutheran Church.

He was married Sept. 16, 1910, to Miss Annie Ebert, born in Phoenixville, Pa., Jan. 12, 1886. She is the daughter of Wm. J. Ebert, a native of Berlin, Germany. Mr. Agsten died in Salisbury township in 1913, aged 59 years. Charles Agsten, his father, was a native of Saxony, Germany. He came to America in early life, and located at South Bethlehem. He died there March 30, 1913, aged 69 years. Charles Agsten served in two wars in the German army, in 1861 and 1871. He was a felt-worker by trade, and after coming to America settled in Butztown, where he worked in the mines for one year; then removed to South Bethlehem, where he worked as a moulder helper in the steel works. He lived retired for 15 years. He was a member of the Lutheran Church, and in politics a Democrat.

Charles Agsten married Mary Shimer, who died in South Bethlehem in 1888. He married, second, Emma Bowman, who is still living. They had 22 children.

Ainey Family

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
The Afney family, of Lehigh county, are descendants of William H. Ainey, of French descent, whose ancestors were Huguenots. When he came to this country he settled in Mohawk Valley, Montgomery Co., N. Y. He was married to Hannah Crawford, of Connecticut. Their son, John, was born in 1802, and was married to Catharine Kinnan, of Goshen, N. Y. William H. Ainey, son of Jacob and Catharine Ainey, was born in Susquehanna county, November 30, 1834. He received his early education in the public schools, which was supplemented by a preparatory course in Woodruff Academy. In 1853 ne was graduated from Harford University, then an institution of learning of high standing in Northern Pennsylvania. He studied law under the direction of Hon. E. B. Chase, of Montrose, Pa. In 1855 he moved to Lehigh county, where he continued his legal studies under Hon. R. E. Wright, of Allentown. He was admitted to the bar Jan. 6, 1857. In i860 he organized the Allentown Savings Institution and was chosen its first president. In 1862 he became the owner of the the Lehigh Register which he edited in connection with his other business duties. He was a vigorous writer and a Republican of pronounced views. In 1863-64 the Second National Bank of Allentown was organized. He was elected its first president, a position he filled up to the time of his death; a large part of the success of this institution was due to his efforts. In 1867 he organized the Lehigh Iron Co. and was chosen its first president, and Continued in this office until the discontinuance of the making of pig iron. In 1872 he was elected one of the fourteen members of the Constitutional convention of 1872-73. This committee framed our present admirable constitution introducing many needed and excellent reforms, which have since been copied and adopted as part of the fundamental l.iws of other states. In 1879 he was one of the prime movers in the re-organization of the Coplay Iron Company of which he was elected tieasurer. In the same year he, in conjunction with George Brooke and H. S. Eckert secured control of the extensive pipe works at Reading, of which company he was elected president. He owned and operated ore mines at the following places: South Whitehall, Upper and Lower Macungie, Longswamp, Maxatawney, all in Pennsylvania, and in Morrison county, N.J. He owned and operated the first local private telegraph line in Lehigh county in 1870. This line was operated between his office in the bank and the furnace at Aineyville. Mr. Ainey was a public-spirited man and through his energy a number of improvements were made and new industries located in Allentown.

He was the prime mover in having the Central Railroad of New Jersey come into Allentown and in the building of the Allentown Terminal Depot. Through his industry and assistance the following industries were established: The Iowa Barb Wire Co., which was later absorbed by the American Steel and Wire Co.; The Pioneer Silk Factory, The Palace Silk Mill, and the Allentown Spinning Company. Mr. Ainey and family were members of the Episcopalian Church. He died on Nov. 12, 1907 at the well-known Ainey residence, corner of Fifth and Hamilton streets, where he had resided since the close of the war.

William H. Ainey was married to Anna C. Unger, who was born Nov. 18, 1843, and died on Feb. 25, 1905, aged 62 years. They had the following children: A. Caroline, married to Robert D. Ghriskey, of Philadelphia; May Hattie, married to Henry J. Foster, now of Scranton, Pa., who at one time was associated in the iron business with Mr. Ainey; Katie Irene, who was an invalid and died in June, 1914; and William H., Jr.

William H. Ainey, Jr., was born in Allentown, January 19, 1890. He was educated in the public schools of Allentown, later he attended Muhlenberg preparatory school, Muhlenberg college, and Hudson River Military Academy, located at Nyack, on the Hudson in N. Y. He became his father's private secretary in the Second National Bank, and filled this position until his father's death. He was also the treasurer of the Edgmont Building Lot Association. Since January, 1911, he is an executor of the William H. Ainey estate. He is an active member of the Y. M. C. A. and the John Hay Republican Association; an active member of the Rescue Fire Co.; an associate member of the Sons of Veterans; the Lehigh Saenger Bund and is an Episcopalian. He is married to Estella M. Fluck, a daughter of Milton S. and Lena (Wagner) Fluck.

Albert, Charles N.

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
Charles N. Albert, a retired citizen of Catasauqua, was born at Reading, Pa., in 1863, and educated in the parochial schools of that city, in Brunner's Business College, and in Dalby's Commercial School of the same place. For five years he was a stationary engineer; then he engaged in the hotel business at Reading which he continued until 1890, when he went to Catrsauqua. Four years later he moved to Northampton, Pa., again four years later he moved to Siegfried, Pa., where he was in business for seventeen months. In the fall of 1900 he purchased the Columbia Hotel at Coplay and conducted it until June 1, 1907, then sold it for a large sum of money, retired, and moved into his fine residence on Second street, Catasauqua. He was successful in his business affairs. Being a popular fancier, he raised fancy and common poultry as a pastime.

In 1890 Mr. Albert was married to Frances Kunkel, a daughter of George Kunkel, late of Philadelphia. They had ten children: Charles, Florence, Edward, Theresa, Marie, Frances, Raymond, Adella, Frank and Gerard. Of these children, Charles, Florence, Edward and Theresa are graduates of St. Mary's parochial school at Catasauqua; and seven of their children are graduates of the Palmer method of writing. Charles G., the oldest son, is employed in the Catasauqua National Bank.

George Francis Albert, the father of Charles N., is a native of Bavaria, Germany, and was born August 17, 1832. In 1858 he emigrated to Pennsylvania, located at Reading, Pa., where he worked on farms in the vicinity for some time; then he began working at blast furnaces, and about 1868 he was made foundry boss of the large establishment of Seyfert & McMannua, at Reading. He served this firm in the same position until 1890, when he went to Catasauqua to accept the position .of general superintendent with the Crane Iron Company, but five years later he resigned and retired, removing to Reading. He and his wife are members of the St. Paul's Catholic church at Reading.

His wife, Eva Mintz, died in 1873 at the age of 41 years. Their children weie: George (of Cleveland, Ohio); John (of Pittsburgh); Augustus (who died at Denver, Colorado, in 1912, at the age of 51 years) ; Charles N.; a daughter (who lives in California) ; Mrs. Henry Blessing (at Reading), and Mrs. John Dillinger at West Catasauqua.

Albright Familly

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
Mrs. Elizabeth Albright, born Jan. 9, 1778, died March 15, 1858, when a widow, settled in Lower Milford township, with her son, Michael Albright. She subsequently married (second) John Ruch (1777-1863), of the same township. They attended the Chestnut Hill church.

Michael H. Albright was born Jan. 19, 1811. He attended the schools of Lower Milford township, and during his youth was accustomed to farm work. He served ten years as a school director and was a justice of the peace from 1860 to 1873, a period of thirteen years. He removed to Allentown in 1873.

Michael H. Albright, married Maria Schaeffer, and had six children. William H., Edwin Albright (deceased); Dr. Franklin P.; Mrs. Henry Mover; Mrs. Israel Wambold, and Mrs. Henry Ackerman, of Philadelphia.

William H. Albright, son. of Michael and Maria (Schaefler) Albright, was born in Upper Milford township, Lehigh county, in 1844. He was reared upon the farm and was educated in the schools of his township and the Keystone State Normal School. He became a well educated man, commencing his business career as a school teacher at an early age. He followed this profession the greater portion of his active life.

In his youth he spent some years in Missouri, as a farmer, clerk, and school teacher. He then returned east, and taught for several years in his native township; then located in Allentown where he became a leading educator. During President Cleveland's administration he served as assistant postmaster of Allentown for four years. His home was at 628 Turner street, where his widow now resides. He was a great student of Bible history and had read the Bible through by course three times. He was at one time a member of the city council, a staunch Democrat and a firm believer in the principles of that party. He was a member of the Royal Arcanum, and of Salem Reformed church. He died June 8, 1904, and was interred in Union cemetery.

William Henry Albright married, July 21, 1877, in Allentown, Miss Alice J. Guth, daughter of Horace and Abigail (Seibert) Guth, of South Whitehall township. Mrs. Albright is a member of Salem Reformed church, and is active in all church work, including the missionary society and charitable work. They had two children: Raymond C. and LeRoy H. Albright. Raymond C. married Mabel Rothenberger, and has children, Alton A. and Evelyn A. M. Albright. LeRoy H., an artist, studied at the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts and is connected with Hess Brothers in the art department. He married Edith Jones, and has children, Grace Alice, Arthur, Dorothy May, and Mildred May Albright.

Amandus A. Albright, senior member of the contracting and building firm trading as Amrndus Albright & Son at Allentown, was born in South Whitehall township, in 1850. When sixteen years of age, he was apprenticed to the trade of carpenter, and afterward followed the business of builder and contractor for upward of twenty years. In 1902, he formed a partnership with his son, Milton A., in conducting planing mill and contract work. Of the more prominent contracts of this firm, the Lutheran churches of St. Stephen, St. Luke, and Christ, at Allentown may be mentioned; and a Lutheran church in South Allentown. They erected several hundred houses in Allentown. They are one of the largest contracting firms in the city and employ about fifty men.

In 1875 Mr. Albright married Chresura Rauch a daughter of Jonas and Polly (Kuhns) Rauch, of Crackersport, and they have eight children: Alice J., married to Victor Gackenbach; Milton A., married Mamie Becker; Mamie R., married to William Best; Victor J., married to Addie Knecht; Elmer J., married to Elsie Wentzell; Bertha H., married to Frank Trump; Marcus R.; and Charles H. They are members of the Lutheran Church.

Milton A. Albright, son of Amandus, was born at Wescoesville, Lehigh county, Sept. 5, 1879. He attended the public schools until 16 years of age, then learned the carpenter trade, which he followed for six years. He removed to Allentown in 1883, and, in later years, with his father engaged in the contracting business. Since 1906 they have also conducted a planing mill. In politics he is a Republican, a member of the Lutheran Church, and belongs to Livingston Castle, K. G. E.; Jordan Council, Jr. O. U. A. M.; and the Order of Maccabees. In 1899 he was married to Mamie M. Becker, daughter of William M. and Mary J. (Schmoyer) Becker, and they have one child, Marguerite M. He resides at 1602 Chew street, Allentown.

John Albright, the father of Amandus, was born April 6, 1813, in South Whitehall township, where he conducted Albright's Hotel for a period of forty years. He owned a farm of seventy acres, which was later sold by his estate for $9,450; and in 1910 this land was sold for $60,000. He had previously been engaged in the mercantile business at Crackersport for four years. He was married to Lucinda Henninger, a daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Sterner) Henninger. She was born Feb. 19, 1816, and died Oct. 21, 1897, aged 81 years, 8 months and 2 days. He died March 19, 1886, aged 72 years, 11 months, 13 days. They are buried in Union cemetery of Allentown. They had eleven children: John; Edwin, born in 1840 and died in 1904; Sarah; Polly; Willoughby; Anna; Amandus; Henry; Reuben; Phaon, born in 1856 and died in 1883; and Israel, all having had families excepting Edwin and Phaon. They were members of the Lutheran Church.

Jacob Albright, a prosperous farmer and for some years also a justice of the peace, resided along the Lehigh river in Whitehall township. His wife was a Frederick. They died of typhoid fever about 1820, of middle age. They had the following children: Polly, married to Samuel Lichtenwalner; Betsy, married to Aaron Guth; Annie, married to John Laubach; Jonas, moved to the West; John; and Mrs. Nathan Guth; all of whom have died.

Alexander, G.

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
G. Alexander, the general superintendent of the Gallia Silk Mills, located at South Bethlehem and Coplay, Pennsylvania, was born May 7, 1869, at Paterson, New Jersey. At the age of twelve years he began to work in the silk mill and by strict application to duty and a willingness to work, his advancement from one position to another followed rapidly. He became a practical man in all the departments in the silk manufacturing business; was foreman at twenty-one of the old Clifton Silk Mill at Union Hill, N. J., having charge there of 70 men; was superintendent for nine years of the Continental Silk Mill, at Phillipsburg, N. J., and since April 1, 1911, he is the general superintendent of the Gallia Silk Mills of Lehigh county.

Socially Mr. Alexander is a member of the Delaware Lodge No. 52 F. & A. M., of Phillipsburg, N. J.

On April 14, 1883., he was united in wedlock with Miss E. Maddocks, a daughter of John Maddocks, of Philadelphia. They have two sons: William H., and G. Alexander, Jr. The oldest son is a member of the sophomore class at Lehigh University and G. Alexander is a student at the Bethlehem Preparatory School.

William Alexander, the father of G. Alexander, was a practical silk man for many years. He now lives retired at Paterson, New Jersey.

Allen, John

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
John Allen, of Allentown, is the son of Charles Allen and Nancy Hazlett. Charles Allen was born in 1822 in County Derry, Ireland, and came to America in 1842. He was employed at Summit Hill, Carbon county, as a coal miner and in 1851 went to Hokendauqua as a foreman for the Crane Iron Company and later was a contractor, excavating iron ore for the company. He resided at Hokendauqua and later at Catasauqua. In 1855 he went to California, where he prospected for gold and owned a mining claim. He returned to Allentown in 1863 and enlisted in Co. A, Seventh Connecticut Volunteers. He became a corporal and was wounded at Pittsburg Landing and taken prisoner. He was confined in Libby prison and later paroled. Gangrene having set in in his leg he went to New York State Hospital and recovered. He then returned to his company and served until mustered out. After the war he was employed in iron ore mining and also built the Lock Ridge Furnace for the Thomas Iron Company at Alburtis. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church. He died in 1875 and was buried at Lehigh church. He had three children: John; Samuel, foreman of the blacksmith shop of the Philadelphia Traction Company; and Jane, deceased, who married Edward Boyle, of Allentown, and had eight children.

John Allen was born Aug. 22, 1852, at Guth's Station and was educated in the common schools of Catasauqua. He served an apprenticeship of three years as a blacksmith with Butz, Frederick & Co., and was then a boilermaker for Cole & Heilman for fifteen years. He then became a boiler inspector for the Hartford Boiler Insurance Company, which position he still fills to the satisfaction both of the company and business men. His territory covers eastern Pennsylvania, in which he inspects 1,000 boilers. He has been one of the foremost men in the upbuilding and improvement of the Tenth ward, in which he has built nearly 100 houses and from which he served as a common councilman from 1903 to 1905. While a member of council he succeeded in having the Tilghman street bridge erected, which project had been started 24 years before. Mr. Allen is a member of Barger Lodge, No. 333, F. & A. M., Allen R. A. Chapter, No. 203; Masonic Veterans Association; Sons of Veterans; and the Presbyterian Church. In politics he is a Republican. He married, April 18, 1875, Ella Amanda, daughter of Samuel and Mary (Ramer) Schuman and had five children, two of whom are deceased. His three living children are: Mary G., supervisor of the primary schools of the city; Martha C, wife of Charles M. Walters, auditor of the L. V. Traction Co.; and Leslie, a student in hydraulic engineering at Lehigh University.

Allison, Henry Willard

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
James Willetts Allison, father of Henry Willard Allison, was born in the State of Pennsylvania, in the Valley of the Susquehanna, attended the common schools of that day, and after his marriage to Mary McLellan Boal, removed to Catlettsburg, Kentucky, where he conducted a general store, and subsequently removed to the heart of the iron operations of southern Ohio, locating at Ironton, where he spent the remainder of his days. He and his wife were the parents of eight children.

Henry Willard Allison was born in Catlettsburg, Kentucky, July 8, 1846, died in Allentown, Oct. 12, 1913. He attended the schools of that village, and when sixteen years of age became an employee of Linton & Keans, iron manufacturers, and later was an employee of the Norton Iron Works, at Ashland, Kentucky. In 1868 he entered the employ of Pardee, Brother & Company, of Hazleton, and went to that state to assume control of coal mining operations for the firm at Lattimer, remaining there seven years, and in 1875 was transferred to Allentown to assume control of the business of the Allentown Rolling Mills, then a Pardee iron interest. He was the secretary, treasurer and general manager of the company, a position he retained up to his death. He was a director of the Second National Bank; president of the Board of Trade, serving from its organization in 1891 and for a number of years thereafter; director of the old Rapid Transit Railway from the time of its organization until its absorption by the Lehigh Valley Traction Company in the early nineties. In the spring of 1888 his name was placed on the Republican ticket for the office of mayor of Allentown, and he was elected to that high position, serving for two years, although elected for four, a new municipal bill having been passed in 1889, affecting Allentown and shortening the term of office. In 1893 he was again elected to the same office and served his full term, and in 1899 was nominated for a third term, but was defeated by Hon. James L. Schaadt. By virtue of the record of his father, who was an officer in an Ohio regiment during the Civil War, he was a member of the Loyal Legion and the Sons of Veterans. He was a member of Barger Lodge, F. & A. M.; Allen Chapter; Allen Commandry; Knights of the Golden Eagle; Lehigh County Agricultural Society, Livingston Club, which he was active in organizing, and of which he was the first president; Young Men's Temperance Society, which he was also active in organizing; and was a director of the Fairview Cemetery Association; director of the Allentown Hospital, at Allentown; and the St. Luke's Hospital, at Bethlehem. Mr. Allison married, in 1879, Clara Unger, of Allentown, her father, L. P. Unger, being the celebrated portrait painter. They were the parents of five children, four daughters and a son, three of whom survive, namely: Mary Pardee, Jean, Marjorie, all of Allentown. The surviving brother and sisters of Mr. Allison are: General James N. Allison, retired from the United States Army, now editor of the Service Journal and stationed at Governor's Island, New York; Mrs. J. P. Young, of Pittsburgh; Mrs. F. J. Norton, of New York City: Miss Stella Allison, of Allentown.

Andreas Family

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
Martin Andreas emigrated from Alsace, on the Rhine, and landed at Philadelphia, Oct. 7, 1749 coming to America on the ship ''Leslie." He settled in Heidelberg township (now Lehigh county) Pa. He served in the American Revolutionary army, as a teamster. He was married and had children as follows: Abraham, Peter, Jacob, William, Martin, and Salome.

Nathan Andres, grandson of Martin, was born Sept. 17, 1823, in Macungie township. He was reared upon the farm and attended the public schools. He was a life-long farmer in his native township. He died May 24, 1904, and was buried at the Western Salisbury church. He married Sarah A. Schantz (1827-1906). Among their children were: N. Peter, and Rev. W. J. Andres, who was born in 1849; he was educated in the public schools and the Keystone State Normal school. He was principal of the Weaversville Academy for several years.

After the completion of his education he entered the ministry of the Reformed church and served pastorates at Moorestown and Bath, Pa. He married Annie E. Mory, daughter of John Mory, of Bath, Pa. No issue. He died in 1907 and interment was at Bath.

N. Peter Andres, son of Nathan, was born in February, 1853, in Macungie township. He was reared upon the farm and attended the public schools up to the age of 18 years. He remained with his father until 1878, when he engaged in the hotel business in Upper Macungie, and conducted Haines' Hotel for three years, then engaged in farming on 119 acres of fertile land, upon which he has been successful. He and family are members of the Western Salisbury Lutheran church which he served as a deacon and elder. He has always been an active and earnest church worker. In politics he is a Democrat and has served as tax collector.

He married Agnes Flexer, daughter of James and Mary (Haines) Flexer. Issue: (1) Macie, married Robert Wescoe, Allentown. Issue: Paul and Catharine Wescoe.

(2) Helen Viola was educated in the public schools and the Allentown College for Women, also the Allentown Business College. She became Sunday school secretary, teacher and organist of the Western Salisbury church, and is prominent in church work. She married Joseph Wehr.

(3) Louise Agnes was educated in the township and Allentown public schools; received instruction in fine needle-work, which she pursues at home.

(4) Isabelle May Andres, at home.

Andrews Family

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
Early in the nineteenth century there were five families by the name of Andrews who lived along the Lehigh river about one mile below Slatington. Among them was Daniel Andrews, who was a cooper, and at the same time conducted a farm. He was married to a daughter of Michael Best with whom he had the following children: Daniel,-Nicholas, Elias, Stephen, Maricha, wife of Samuel Hankee, Philip and Lydia, wife of Stephen Schaeffer.

Nicholas Andrews, a son of Daniel Andrews, was born in 1818 on the old homestead south of Slatington and died November 20, 1887. He was a blacksmith and followed this trade where he lived and at Cherryville. He owned the old homestead in partnership with his brother Elias. He and his family were members of the Fricden's Church. He was married to Eliza Schneck with whom he had the following children: Eli, Lewis, Benjamin, Jane, Amanda, wife of Emmanuel Kern, and Adeline, wife of Henry Bentz.

Eli Andrews, of Slatington, a son of Nicholas Andrews was born on the old homestead south of Slatington, January 21, 1842. He learned the shoemaker trade when twenty years of age and followed it for seven years. On August 8, 1862, he enlisted in Company G, 128th Regiment Pennsylvania Vol. Infantry under Captain Peter C. Huber. He served nine months and was in the battle of Antietam and Chancellorsville, being taken prisoner in the latter battle. He was incarcerated in Libby prison at Richmond for sixteen weeks. Returning to Slatington he worked in the quarries for some time. He was also policeman for the borough for three years. He is a member of the G. A. R., Post No. 284, at Slatington, having filled the office of Junior and Senior Commander. On July 19, 1864, he was married to Amanda Sourwine, a daughter of David and Elizabeth (Newhard) Sourwine. They had four children as follows: James P., Postmaster at Walnutport, Pa.; Lillie, wife of Tilghman Eckert, of Walnutport; Mary, wife of John Wassam, Jr.; William D., of Slatington.

Elias Andrews, son of Daniel Andrews, had the following children: Amanda P., Wilson F., mentioned later; Alfred J., Alice J., Francis E., Calvin H., and a daughter married to J. T. Schlosser.

Wilson F. Andrews, who was a prominent business man of Slatington, Pa., was the second among five children of Elias and Mary (Kuntz) Andrews. He was born about two miles south of Slatington on January 31, 1852, and grew up in an environment which played an important part in shaping of his future career pertaining to building and mechanical pursuits.

His father was an all around man, running a farm, a saw-mill, a cider press in season, blacksmith shop and carpenter shop besides being a natural adept at woodwork, which traits the sons inherited to a large degree. Being frail of physique, and not wishing to engage in any of the strenuous pursuits of his father, he decided to learn the general merchandise business and after holding various positions in grocery stores in Slatington and Allentown, he left home with the funds he had saved out of his earnings, for the Williamsport Commercial College where he took a course in business. Completing his course he returned home and with his brother Amandas P. formed a partnership and engaged in the general store business at Walnutport, erecting their own building. Upon the death of his wife which occurred in 1889, he sold out his interest to his younger brother, A. J. Andrews, and a year later purchased the stock of S. DeLong in the Alex. Weaver building, at Slatington, later erecting his own large store building, and which business he successfully conducted up to 1904 when he sold his entire stock to J. M. Nicklas, of New York City, and retired from active business. He served one year as a member of the Slatington School Hoard. He was a member of the Jr. O. U. A. M., also a member of Frieden's Reformed Congregation, up to the time of his death on February 10, 1909. Surviving him are the widow, Ida V. (Saeger) his second wife, one son, Walter H., one daughter, Bertha J., from the first marriage, and two daughters, Clara and Arlene, from the second union.

Walter H. Andrews, of Slatington, was born in Walnutport, Pa., February 13, 1880. He received the major part of his public school education in Slatington, graduating as salutatorian of his class in 1898. Following this he took a course in business training at the Peirce School at Philadelphia, graduating in 1899. After leaving school he was employed in his father's wall paper and stationery store and six months later entered the employ of the Slatington Rolling Mill Co. under the management of the well known iron master, W. P. Hopkins. In 1907 he was elected Secretary as well as a director of the corporation, which position he held until Spring 1911, when the company went into voluntary liquidation. A new company having been formed and incorporated largely through the efforts of Mr. Edwin German, of Slatington, the right title and interest was purchased, and Walter H. Andrews was elected Secretary and Treasurer of this new corporation known as the Slatington Rolling Mills. He was married in 1903 to Emma L. Kramer, a daughter of Wesley and Mary (Mushlitz) Kramer. The following children are born to this union: Earl W., Marian K., and Helen I.

Anewalt Family

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
Valentine Anewalt was born Jan. 12, 1732, and emigrated to America on the ship "Snow Squirrel," which arrived at Philadelphia, Oct. 22, 1761. He settled in Allen township, Northampton county, where he purchased from Thomas Boyd on July 1, 1778, for £670, a tract of 103 acres and 36 perches of land, a part of the 6,000-acre "Indian tract," and on Nov. 27, 1784, purchased from Frederick Beck, a tract of 20 acres and 10 perches for £100 specie. He was a farmer and weaver and in 1785 was taxed 13 s. 6 d. on 120 acres of land, two horses and two head of cattle. He served as a private in the Revolutionary War under Col. John Siegfried. He was a member of the Lutheran congregation at Kreidersville church, where he is buried. He died Feb. 8, 1802, aged 70 years. He married, in 1753, Johanna Margret Kurtz, who was born Nov. 13, 1733, and died July 31, 1793. His second wife, Anna Barbara, was born May 14, 1743, and died Aug. 4, 1828. She had no children. Valentine Anewalt's will, dated Nov. 22, 1801, mentions nine children, as follows: Catharine, who married Henry Gerster, and removed to Franklin county; Margaret, who married a Mr. Jones; John, born in 1764, who settled in Somerset county, where he became a brewer; Susanna, born about 1767; Jacob, born Feb. 6, 1769; Christina, born Oct. 19, 1770, who married Jacob Stapp; Peter, born Nov. 12, 1772; George, who in 1802, resided in Towamensing township; Conrad, born Feb. 14, 1778.

Peter Anewalt, third son of Valentine, was born Nov. 22, 1772, and died July 20, 1825. He was a farmer and weaver and owned 150 acres of land in Allen township and 145 acres in Lehigh township. He married Anna Barbara Waltman, who was born June 5, 1778, and died Aug. 4, 1853. They had four children: Peter, born April 7, 1797; Elizabeth, born March 19, 1799, married John Miller; Catharine, born Dec. 24, 1802, maried George Hower; Lydia.

Peter Anewalt, son of Peter, was born April 7, 1797, in Allen township, and died March 3, 1841. He married Elizabeth Bliem, who was born May 3, 1800, and died Oct. 11, 1856. He was a farmer and weaver in Allen township, and had seven children: Stephen, deceased, late of Bethlehem; Elizabeth, married to Stephen Kleppinger; Lucy, married to Henry Scholl, of Bath; John CM of Allentown; George, of Bethlehem; Samuel B., of Allentown; William, who died at Bath in 1862, aged about 28 years.

JOHN C. ANEWALT, eldest son of Peter, was born in Allen township, March 22, 1830. He received a common school education and after clerking in stores at Petersville and Bath, opened a store at Siegfried with his bVother-in-law, Stephen Kleppinger. He removed to Allentown in 1861 and became a salesman for Messrs. Keck & Anewalt, hat dealers, and after Mr. Keck's death, became a partner in the firm of Anewalt & Brother. He retired from the firm in 1881, when he and his son, Lewis L., conducted the retail business, S. B. Anewalt taking the wholesale business. In 1884, he retired from active business. Mr. Anewalt was connected with the legislative end of the city government for many years, first as a member of the common council from 1886 to 1889, then as a select member from 1889 to 1895. In appreciation of his valued services to the city, finely engraved resolutions were presented to him upon his retirement from office. His associates in the latter body presented him an ebony gavel, trimmed with gold, as a token of appreciation of his fair and impartial administration as their presiding officer for a period of four years. He was one of the organizers and owners of West End cemetery, and was a member of St. Paul's Ev. Lutheran church. He died at his residence at Eighth and Chew streets on Aug. 27, 1896. Mr. Anewalt married, Nov. 8, 1853, Miss Henrietta Goetz, who was born in Hanover township Nov. 20, 1832, and died Sept. 30, 1880. He married, second, Mrs. Esther Bleam, nee Fehler. Mr. Anewalt had five children: Wilmer W.; Lewis L.; Harry P.; Elenora E., deceased, married Arthur L. Cooper; and Alice A., wife of Rev. Morris F. Good.

WILMER W. ANEWALT, eldest son of John C, was born at Catasauqua, Feb. 16, 1857. He was educated in the public and high schools of Allentown and as a young man became a clerk in the hat store of Anewalt & Brother. In 1891 he formed a partnership in the hat business with his brother, Lewis L., and continued in this business until his death on June 3, 1899, which was caused by injuries sustained in a trolley car accident while on his way home from business. Mr. Anewalt was a member of St. Paul's Lutheran church, and in politics a republican. He married, March 8, 1877, Lorraine, daughter of Abraham and Esther (Kemmerer) Worman, of Allentown. They had two sons, Charles L., and John A., who conduct a hat store at 615 Hamilton street under the firm name of Anewalt Brothers.

LEWIS L. ANEWALT, second son of John C, was born in Allentown, Oct. 7, 1861. He received his education in the schools of the city and entered his father's store as a young man, where he remained until he formed a partnership with his brother in 1891. After his brother's death, he opened a hat store at 617 Hamilton street, where he conducts a wholesale and retail business as Lewis L. Anewalt Company. Mr. Anewalt is an active member of St. John's Reformed church; a director of the Citizen's Deposit and Trust Company; a member of the Chamber of Commerce; a member of Greenleaf Lodge, No. 561, F. & A. M.; Allen Chapter, No. 203, R.A. M.; Allen Commandery, No. 20, K. T., Caldwell Consistory; Rajah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S.; and of the Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution. He married, Nov. 2, 1884, Irene A. E., daughter of Wm. C. and Amelia C. (Fogel) Lichtenwalner. They have two sons, Harold F., and Paul F., who arc associated with their father in the hat and fur business.

SAMUEL B. ANEWALT, son of Peter Anewalt and his wife Elizabeth Bliem, has been for more than half a century a resident of Allentown, the greater part of which time he was engaged in business as a dealer in hats. He was born in Allen township, Northampton county, March 20, 1835, and attended the local schools until the age of fourteen, when he learned the trade of a painter, at which he spent two years. He then became a clerk in a store at Siegfrieds, where he remained five years and in 1857 came to Allentown and entered the employ of Coleman Keck, with whom he continued until the Civil War, when he enlisted June 19, 1863, in Co. H, Twenty-seventh Regiment, Emergency Troops, under Capt. Isaac N. Gregory, in which company he held the rank of corporal. The company went to Columbia and crossed the bridge over the Susquehanna to Wrightsville. Upon the attack of the Confederates on the town last named, they retreated with the regiment and burned the bridge behind them. They were shelled by General Ewell. The regiment later moved to Carlisle, then to Waynesboro, Boonsboro, Hagerstown, Greencastle, Mercersburg, and Chambersburg.

After his return Mr. Anewalt entered the hat business, forming a partnership with his brother, John C, under the firm name of Anewalt & Brother, which continued until 1896, when John C. died, and Mr. Anewalt continued the business, taking in his sons as partners, under the firm name of S. B. Anewalt & Company, until he retired from active business in 1908. Since that time the business has been conducted by his sons, William H. and Samuel, Jr. The present store building at Eighth and Hamilton streets was erected in 1869 and the firm is one of the oldest in the city.

Mr. Anewalt is noted for his high standard of citizenship and has taken a deep interest in Allentown (the city of his adoption), its people and its institutions. He is public spirited, enterprising and progressive. He was one of the organizers of the Lehigh Valley Trust Company and has been a stockholder and director ever since, serving as vice-president for twenty-three years and as president from 1899 to 1902. He is a staunch Republican, having voted the Whig ticket in 1856 and cast a Republican vote at each election since then. He has served as school director in Allentown for eight years and for a period served as president of the school board. He and family are members of St. John's Lutheran church and reside at Sixth and Chew streets.

Mr. Anewalt married, June 7, 1864, Caroline Keck, daughter of Solomon Keck and his wife, Anna, nee Saeger. They had seven children, namely: Annie, married Dr. Howard S. Seip; Kate R., married Edward M. Young; William H., who married Mary E. Everett; Mary, deceased, was married to Dr. George Lazarus, of Brooklyn, N. Y.; Emma, married Edward Gomery, of Philadelphia; Samuel B., Jr., married Jessie Balliet; and Edward F., who married Florence Rhoads, and is engaged in the gent's furnishing business at Reading, Pa.

Appel Family

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
John Appel, son of Paul, was a farmer in Upper Saucon township, and also conducted Appel's hotel, near Mountainville. He was born in Saucon and died in 1859, aged 55 years. He is buried on Fairview cemetery, Allentown. He married Mary E. Keck. They had two sons, Allen K., whose history follows, and Milton, who lived in Allentown. The latter had a daughter, Ida M., married to W. A. Hausman, a resident of Allentown.

Allen K. Appel was born July 14, 1830. He was a school teacher in his earlier life, having been a graduate of Gregory's Academy, at Allentown. Afterward he followed farming and also was the proprietor of Appel's hotel, near Mountainville. He married Maria Knauss, born April 5, 1830, died June 5, 1912. He died Sept. 8, 1860. Their children follow: Mary E., who married Dr. Ervin Heyl, and after his death she married Reuben S. Leisenring, whose history appears elsewhere in this volume; John, deceased, who succeeded his father upon the farm which was the Henry Keck homestead, having been purchased in 1732. A little stone house on this farm was built before the middle of the eighteenth century and it is still standing. George Keck began building the present large house in 1812, and while he was away in the war his faithful wife completed the house.

Arbogast Family

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
The ancestors of this representative Pennsylvania family came from Germany on the ship "Edinburgh," which arrived at Philadelphia, Sept. 16, 1751. His name on the ship's list of passengers is recorded as Johannes Arbengast. He was married and had among others two sons, Ludwig and Johannes. Johannes Arbogast, the son of Johannes, who emigrated, became one of the pioneer settlers in the territory which was embraced in the original Penn township, Snyder county. This territory was included in old Northumberland county, which was organized in 1772. That this pioneer planned well and was a most industrious and prosperous citizen of colonial Pennsylvania is evidenced by his many recorded land purchases and by his last will and testament which covers two pages, viz, 145 and 146, in Will Book 2, in the register's office at Sunbury, Pa. The will is a model in many respects, and reflects the noble character of the testator, who divided a very large estate among his five sons and three daughters, and for his dear wife, Catharine, who survived him, he provided most liberally.

The name of Ludwig Arbogast appears among a list of non-commissioned officers and privates of the First Pennsylvania Regiment, of the Continental Line, in the Revolutionary War. On Oct. 13, 1776, he was wounded at the Block House, and was discharged March 23, 1783. In 1835, he was still living, and resided in Philadelphia. Penna. Archives, Fifth Series.

The executors of the will were his sons, John and Ludwig Arbogast; and the witnesses to the document were his neighbors, John Moatz and Nich. Roth (or Rath). The will was made on the 15th day of April, 1811, and probated May 14th of the following month. It is evident that John Arbogast, the pioneer, passed from this life into his reward between these two dates. The names of the children follow in order as they are named in the will:

1. "I give and devise unto my son Nicholas, the sum of 400 pounds."

2. "I give and devise unto my son Peter, the plantation whereon he now lives, for which he shall pay out 100 pounds."

3 and 4. "I give and devise unto my two sons, John and Ludwig, whereon they now dwell, which I will and order shall be equally divided between the said John and Ludwig. (A long description as to how the land is to be divided then follows.) A public road passed through John's land to the town of Middleburg. John was to pay out the sum of 350 pounds; and Ludwig was to pay out 150 pounds."

5. "I give and bequeath unto my son William, 400 pounds.

6. "I give and devise unto my daughter, Catharine, now the wife of Christopher Schatzberger, the one-half of the undivided plantation whereon she now dwells, which is my share of such plantation."

7. "I give and devise unto my daughter, Anna Maria, now the wife of Jacob Felmly, the sum of 243 pounds."

8. "I give and devise unto my daughter, Barbara, now the wife of John Zwally, the sum of 243 pounds."

The will follows:

In the name of God, Amen, I John Arbogast of Perm township, in the County of Northumberland, and State of Pennsylvania. Being weak in body but of sound and understanding mind, memory and understanding blessed be God for the same, but considering the uncertainty of this transitory life do make and publish this my last will and testament in manner and form following to wit:—Principally and first of all I commend my immortal soul into the hands of God who gave it to me, and my body to the earth to be buried in a decent and Christian like manner, at the direction of my executors hereinafter named, and as to such worldly estate wherein it hath pleased God to bless me in this life I give and dispose of the same in the following manner, to wit: First, I order that my executors shall pay all my funeral expenses as soon as possible and payable my just debts. I give and devise unto my dear wife Catharine, out of my real and personal property estate during her natural life the room wherein we now dwell and she is to have her right in the kitchen and the one-third of the garden and the kitchen dresser and as much of the kitchen furniture as she shall want, and one copper kettle and one table, four chairs, two beds, one clock and case and her choice of the chests, and she may take two, one ten plate stove and pipe, and her wheel and reel and two milk cows, her choice; one testament and one hymn book, and the one-third of the cellar and two tubs, her choice; also a right to as many apples as she shall want and one hive of bees, her choice; and one-third of the fowls on the plantation where we now dwell. I give and devise unto my son, Nicholas Arbogast, the sum of four hundred pounds, lawful money of the State of Pennsylvania, which he hath already received from me. I give and devise unto my son, Peter Arbogast, the plantation whereon he now lives for which he shall pay out one hundred pounds of lawful money of the State aforesaid, unto my hereinafter named heirs. I give and devise unto my two sons, John and Ludwig Arbogast, the plantation whereon they now dwell, which I will and order shall be equally divided between the said John and Ludwig, beginning on the Chestnut Ridge, a corner of said land and Jacob Moyer's land, thence in a strict line to the road to the line of said land and John Motz's land, except a piece of meadow ground of five acres to be the same more or less which would come within the aforesaid, John's line bordering on the public road leading through said John s land to the town of Middleburg, and my son John shall allow my aforesaid son Ludwig. a road threw his land to the aforesaid meadow. I will and order that my aforesaid son. John, shall pay out of his estate of land unto my heirs herein after named the sum of three hundred and fifty pounds lawful money of the State of Pennsylvania. I hereafter shall direct; and I will and order that my son, Ludwig. shall pay out of his share of land unto my hereinafter named heirs, the sum of one hundred and fifty pounds of lawful money of the State of Pennsylvania, as I hereafter shall direct. I give and bequeath to my son, William Arbogast. four hundred pounds like lawful money as aforesaid.

I will and order that the money that my son, William, hath already received from me shall be in part of the said four hundred pounds and the balance of the four hundred pounds shall be paid as I hereinafter direct. I give and devise unto my daughter, Catharine, now the wife of Christopher Schatzberger, the one-half of the undivided plantation whereon she now dwells, which is my share of said plantation. I give and devise unto my daughter. Anna Maria, now the wife of Jacob Felmly, the sum of 243 pounds, lawful money aforesaid. I will and order that it shall be paid her as I shall hereafter direct, first deducting out of said sum what she or Felmly have already received. I give and devise unto my daughter, Barbara, now the wife of John Zwally, the sum of 243 pounds, like money aforesaid, I will and order shall be paid her as I shall hereinafter direct, first deducting out of said sum that she or Zwally have already received. I will and order that my son Peter pay or cause to be paid the aforesaid sum of one hundred pounds unto three of my aforesaid heirs. William, Anna Maria, and Barbara or their survivors of them, in yearly payments, that is to say, fifteen pounds yearly until the said 100 pounds are fully paid each.

(Here follows at length how more money shall be paid by the various heirs.)

And as touching all the rest residue and remainder of my personal estate I will and order that my hereinafter named executors shall take an inventory and expose the same to public sale as soon as they can after my disease, and the money now in my hands and the money standing out shall by my executors be applied toward pattening the land that I have bequeathed to my two sons, John and Ludwig, and then, if there is any money left in their hands they shall put it on interest, and the interest shall be paid to my wife. Catharine, as long as she lives and after her death I order that my executors shall sell by public sale the personal estate now let my wife Catharine and the money arising from sale and all other moneys of my estate I order shall be equally divided between my five sons and three daughters, and lastly I nominate and appoint my two sons, John and Ludwig Arbogast, both of Penn Township in the county aforesaid, to be the executors of my last will and testament.

In witness thereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the 15 day of April, 1811.
Witness: John Moatz,
Nich. Roth (or Rath)
Signed in German. Johannes Arbogast.
Probated May 14, 1811. Recorded in File 37, Will Book 2, pages 145, 146.


Peter Arbogast, the second son of Johannes, and the grandfather of Wilson Arbogast, was a farmer in Snyder county, Pennsylvania. He died about 1859, aged 80 years, and is buried at Grubb's church, of which he was a member of the Lutheran congregation. He was married twice. The first wife was Margaret Long, and their children were: Jonathan; John; and Barbara, who was married to a Steffy. The children by his second wife were: Simon, Peter, and William.

John Arbogast, the second son of Peter, removed to the state of Indiana, and from there to California, where he died and is buried.

Simon Arbogast settled in Ohio.

Peter Arbogast remained in Snyder county, and was a farmer in the Flint Stone Valley.

William Arbogast lived at Freeburg, Snyder county, Pa.

Jonathan Arbogast, the oldest son of Peter, and the father of Wilson, of Allentown, was born in Washington township, Snyder county, on April 13, 1810. He was baptized on July 31st, of the same year, and his sponsors were Jonathan and Catharine Long, probably his grandparents. His birth certificate is in possession of his son, Gustavus. There he owned and conducted a farm of 125 acres. He was a strong supporter of the free school system, serving as a school director of his township for many years.

He married Catharine Busier, a daughter of Jacob and Sarah (Battorf) Busier. She was born in 1821, died in 1893. Mr. Arbogast died in July, 1883. They are buried in Freeburg, Pa. They had the following children: 1. William, who died unmarried about 1859. 2. Jonathan B., married Julia Ann Ricgel, and their children were: Mary, Alice, Catharine, and Maggie. 3. Wilson, history follows. 4. Henry, married Emma Kautz. They resided in the West. He died in 1907. They had three children. 5. John, married Amanda Kantz. They also reside in the West, and have three children. 6. Gustavus. 7. Mary, married Elmer Sechrist, and they have a son, Roy.

Arbogast, Wilson

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
The president of the packing house of Arbogast & Bastian, at Allentown, Pennsylvania, is Wilson Arbogast. He is a native of Freeburg, Snyder county, Pa., having been born in 1851, a son of Jonathan and Catharine (Busier) Arbogast.

Wilson Arbogast enjoyed the best educational advantages, beginning in the public schools in his community, and pursuing advanved courses of study in a preparatory academy, after which he entered the Keystone State Normal School, graduating from that institution in 1875- He then taught school another term in Mahanoy township, Northumberland county, having taught there four terms altogether. In the year 1876, he removed to Martin's Creek, Northampton county, where he continued the profession of teaching in a most satisfactory manner, and during the same period of time, Mr. Arbogast conducted a general merchandise store at the same place. In 1882, he disposed of his stock of goods, and for the following three years he carried on a provision business in Phillipsburg, New Jersey. In 1887, he formed an association with Morris C. Bastian, under the firm name of Arbogast & Bastian, which organization was the foundation of the present house of Arbogast & Bastian Company, at Allentown. The success which attended the efforts of this concern bespeak high merit both for Mr. Arbogast and his congenial associate, Mr. Bastian. This firm not only erected a monumental business but they also created the trade for it. The reputation of this house is not limited to the confines of its own state. The superior product of the Arbogast & Bastian Company is sold in all the large cities of the East. During his entire career, Mr. Arbogast has maintained a reputation and character that is beyond reproach. He and family are members of the Lutheran Church. His fraternal connections are with the Masonic Lodge, having membership in Barger Lodge, No. 333, F. & A. M., at Allentown. In politics he is a Republican. He has served as a school director for two years in the First ward, also for a like term of years he was a councilman. After his removal to No. 217 North Fourth street, Fifth ward, he served that district in the school board for 2 years, and in 1911, under the new school code, he was one of the nine men to be elected for a term of six years, from a large list of candidates as a school controller of the city of Allentown. He is now (1914) the vice-president of the board.

In 1876, he was married to Emily Haas, daughter of Charles and Mary (Rinn) Haas. They have the following children: 1. Porter B., born at Martin's Creek, Pa. He graduated from the Allentown high school, and then spent two years in study abroad, during which time he received masterly instruction upon the violin, in Liege, Belgium, and at the time of his death in 1907, he was manager of the company's branch at Reading. His age was but 31 years. His widow, Sadie H., nee Hartner, and two children, Emily and Frederick, suvive him. They live at No. 211 North Fourth street, Allentown. 2. Elsie B., is the wife of Elwood J. Faust, who occupies and cultivates the Arbogast farm of 113 acres, situated near Easton, Pa. They have the following children: Wilson, Donald, and Caroline. 3. Gustavus, who died at the age of fourteen years. 4. Mary Catharine, is married to Perry H. Rahn, connected with the Arbogast & Bastian Company. They have three children: Mary, Richard, and Douglass. 5. Arthur, who is a student at the Medico Chirurgical college, Philadelphia.

Arbogast, Gustavus

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
Gustavus Arbogast, the sixth son of Jonathan, was born Jan. 27, 1858. He attended the schools in Washington township, and there he followed farming until in 1886, when he removed to Freeburg, Pa., where he lived until his removal to Allentown in 1892. He has since been employed by Arbogast & Bastian, at Allentown.

On July 1, 1883, he married Lydia, a daughter of Samuel and Amelia (Jarrett) Hendricks, of Snyder county. They have the following children: 1. William, married to Iva Conrad. They reside at Allentown and have two children. 2. Mary, married to Rev. E. O. Marks, a Reformed minister, located at Johnstown, Pa. 3. Lester C, married to Mabel Bower. They live at Allentown. 4. Elwood, died aged eleven years.

Arner Family

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
(I) Johan Ulrich Arner, from the Palatinate, emigrated to America on the ship Mercury, which arrived at Philadelphia May 29, 1735. This early pioneer was born in 1693, being 42 years old when he landed in this country. He was accompanied by his wife, Verona, and four children: Verona, aged 9; Felix, aged 7; Hans Ulrich, aged 5; and Margaret, aged 4. On July 24, 1737, the records of the Goshenhoppen Reformed church mention the baptism of Anna Catharine, daughter of Ulrich and Verona Arner. After a lapse of five years, namely, on Sept. 19, 1742, a son, Heinrich was baptized by Rev. Wuertz.

(I) Johan Ulrich Arner in 1746 was one of the founders of the Heidelberg Church located in the upper part of what is now Lehigh county, and contributed to its erection. On Feb. 27, 1744, he secured a warrant for 105 acres of land located along the Jordan creek in North Whitehall township, and on May 26, 1751, a second warrant for 25 acres. About the year 1750 he sold a tract of nearly 400 acres in the former township to Michael Deiber. In the year 1762, the tax list of Heidelberg township shows that he paid a tax of five English pounds.

(2) Felix Arner was born Jan. 14, 1726, and died in the vicinity of the Egypt church, where he is also buried, on Feb. 20, 1776. On Oct. 18, 1752, he secured a warrant for 25 acres of land, and on Jan. 28, 1771 another for 15 acres. His widow Elizabeth, later married Peter Anthony. (2) Felix and Elizabeth Arner had the following children: Jacob; Anna Margareth, (m. John Kern) ; Susanna Margaret, (m. Jacob Berger) ; Catharine, (m. Jacob Hunsicker) ; Elizabeth, (m. Daniel Rex) ; Margaret; Salome; John; Felix; William; and Dorothea.

(3) William Arner, son of Felix, was born in what is now Lehigh county. Early in life he was a resident of Heidelberg township, and after his marriage to Magdalena Krum they removed to East Penn township, Carbon county, where he was a taxable in 1799. By occupation he was a farmer. He and his wife are buried at Bensalem Church, of which they were Reformed members. Their children were: John; Elizabeth, (b. March 29, 1793, a twin to John, m. Joseph Mertz) ; Henry; David; Joseph; Maria (m. Thomas Beltz) ; Molly (m. Adam Dreisbach); and Catharine (m. Daniel Gerber).

(4) John Arner was born in Heidelberg township, March 29, 1793, and moved with his parents to Carbon county. Later he came to South Whitehall township where he worked upon a farm and married Sarah Diehl, born Feb. 17, 1792, a daughter of Jacob and Anna (Riebsammin) Diehl. They continued to work and live upon the farm along the Jordan for several years. He then purchased a 16-acre tract of land in Upper Macungie, where his wife died March 13, 1878. He followed her in death a year later, on March 28, 1879. They are both buried at the Jordan Reformed Church, of which they were members, and of which he was a deacon and elder for many years. He was also a school director in Upper Macungie for a number of terms. By occupation he was a carpet-weaver, and also made linsey-woolsey.

(5) John and Sarah Arner had the following named children: Moses and Judith, who died young; Mary Anna, b. Dec. 16, 1823, (m. Peter Haas); Eliza, b. Dec. 2, 1825, (m. Tilghman Sell); Edward, b. Aug. 13, 1828. (Lived in Upper Macungie and later in South Whitehall. Was a carpenter and later farmer. His wife was Maria Anna Semmel. He died Jan. 12, 1899.) ; Sarah, b. July 2, 1830, (m. Henry M. Larosh) ; Lucy, (m. Edward Peter) ; Carolina, was a maiden lady; and Aaron.

(6) Aaron Arner born Feb. 9, 1837, resides near the Jordan creek in South Whitehall. As a boy he attended the common schools, and later learned his trade from his father, with whom he worked until he was 21, weaving carpets, linens and flannels. He then learned the carpenter trade, which he followed about 50 years, and during these years travelled many miles with his carpenter tools upon his back. He would frequently leave home on Monday morning at 3 o'clock, and walk from Upper Macungie to Catasauqua and Fullerton. In 1873 he purchased his present home in South Whitehall, to which belong nine acres. On this property is a large stone house that was built by Peter Snyder in 1811. After his children were grown up and left home, he resumed weaving, so that he could remain near his cozy and well-managed home.

Aaron Arner, like his father, is a member of the Jordan Reformed church, which he has at various times served as deacon, elder and trustee. Earlier in life he and his family were members of the Morgenland Church, of whch he was also a deacon. Politically he is a Democrat, and has served as school director and treasurer of South Whitehall. In 1863 he married Amanda Haas, daughter of Henry Haas, and they had these children: (7) Webster J.; Frank A.; Dr. Edgar W., (b. 1869, and d. 1894, at Fairview, Luzerne county, Pa., as the result of a railroad accident) ; and Lillie V., (m. Levi Ziegler, of Chapman's Station, Pa.).

(7) Frank Arner, of Allentown, was born in Upper Macungie, July 29, 1866. He received his early education in the township schools, select schools and also took a course in the Allentown Business College, from which he graduated. He taught school four terms in South Whitehall, and in 1888 accepted a clerical position in Allentown. In 1906 he resigned his position and engaged in the business of wholesaling coffees, teas, rice, peanuts, etc., at 913 Linden Street.

Since 1889 Mr. Arner has been a member of Salem Reformed Church and from then until 1912 served as a teacher in the Sunday school, when he was elected one of the assistant superintendents. He was also treasurer of the Sunday school from 1896 until 1912. In 1894 he was elected a deacon of the church, which position he filled until 1900; and during these years was also financial secretary.

Fraternally he is a member of Livingstone Castle No. 258, K. G. E.( and of Camp No. 196, P. O. S. of A.

In 1892 Mr. Arner married Alice E. Mover, daughter of the late Henry L., and Eliza (Albright) Moyer, and they have three children: Marguerite A.; Anna M.; and Paul A.

(7) Webster J. Arner, also a son of Aaron, a citizen of Allentown, was born in Upper Macungie March l, 1864. He was educated in the public schools, and reared on the farm. He learned paper box manufacturing in Binghamton, N. Y., and was employed in that city seven years. He then started a plant of which he was given entire charge as general superintendent, for a large corporation, which position he held six years. In February, 1892, he came to Allentown and became manufacturing manager for M. H. Ryan and Company who employ about 60 people. He and family are members of the Presbyterian church.

Fraternally Mr. Arner is a member of the order of K. of F., Liberty No. 45; Lecha Tribe No. 185, I. O. R. M.; Maccabees, and the Modern Brotherhood of America. Politically he has served in the office of Trustee at McGraw, N. Y., which corresponds to councilman in Pennsylvania. He married in 1885 Minnie Roencrance, of Binghamton, N. Y., and their children are: Nina (m. Elwood L. Maloney, Philadelphia) and Lola.

(3) Henry Arner son of William, and grandson of Felix, was born in Lehigh county, and while a child was taken with his parents to Carbon county. In 1817 he first rented a farm in Mahoning township, and about 1820 opened a shoe factory. In 1832 he erected a powder mill, and was the first to manufacture powder in Eastern Pennsylvania, outside of Philadelphia. His mill was accidentally blown up on three different occasions, resulting in the loss of five lives. One of these explosions which occurred on June 8, 1841, killed his brother Daniel. Fire falling out of an old "tallow dip" lamp such as were then in use, was the cause of one catastrophe.

In addition to manufacturing powder Henry Arner operated a large farm, and was a man of more than common enterprise. He was a member of the German Reformed Church, and is buried at Becks Church in his native township. His first wife was Catharine Moyer, and they had six children: Ammon, Tilghman, Daniel, Eliza (m. Benjamin Koons), Louisa (m. Zachariah H. Long), and Abigail (m. first Mr. Hunsicker and second Amos Riegel). Henry Arner married secondly Harriet Hainey and by her had seven children: Thomas J.; Henry B. Mc; William J.; Joseph D.; Ellen K. (m. Charles F. Ross) ; Emily J. (m. Maurice Montz) ; and Sophia J., (m. first George Siglen and second Joseph Turnbach).

(4) Ammon Arner, the second son of Henry, was born Feb. 2, 1822 in Mahoning township. He was actively engaged with his father in the manufacture of powder, and after the death of the latter conducted the business alone, in addition to operating the homestead farm. In 1869 he turned his attention to mercantile pursuits at New Mahoning, continuing until 1894 when he sold out to hs son-in-law, Lewis J. Zimmerman, and retired from active business. He was a Reformed member of Becks Church, which he served as deacon.

On April 18, 1848, Ammon Arner married Annie Beltz, daughter of John and Hannah (Hummel) Beltz, of Mahoning township. His death occurred in 1904, and his remains are buried at Becks Church. His wife died Nov. 17, 1901, aged 70 years. They had eleven children, as follows: John H.; Israel (died when a young man) ; Moses D. (in 1880 settled in Clay county, Kansas); Catharine J. (m. Lewis Zimmerman, of New Mahoning) ; Lillie A. (m. Rev. J. S. Heisler, a prominent minister of the East Pennsylvania Conference of the United Evangelical Church, stationed at Sunbury, Pa., since 1911) ; and six children, deceased, of whom four died of diphtheria within a period of 13 days. Two of the latter were buried in one grave.

John H. Arner, of Allentown, Pa., is a native of Mahoning township, Carbon county, where he was born in 1849 and reared upon the farm. When 15 years old he began clerking in his father's store, which he managed for 14 years. For 20 years he was a travelling salesman, and in 1884 located in Allentown where he has since resided. He filled a clerical position with T. J. Dunn & Co., who have a branch cigar factory in Allentown, and was their shipping clerk a number of years. Since 1911 he has been receiving clerk for Hess Brothers. He was married in 1868 to Mary Wehr, daughter of Peter Wehr and his wife, Elizabeth Rauch, of Heidelberg township, Lehigh county, and they have three children: Calvin E.; Minnie (m. William Pascoe of Wapwallopen, Pa.); and Luella (m. George Sell, of Allentown, Pa.).

Calvin E. Arner, Esq., of Allentown, is a native of Carbon county, and was born Oct. 7, 1869. He was educated in the Palatinate College Myerstown, Pa., and at Franklin and Marshall College, graduating from the latter institution in 1890. He read law with the Honorable Edward Harvey, now deceased, and on Sept. l3, 1893, was admitted to the bar. Latter he was admitted to practice before the higher courts of the state. He has offices at No. 610 Hamilton street. Mr. Arner is a staunch adherent of the principles of the Democratic party. From 1905 to 1911 he served as a member of the common council, being elected from the Fourth ward, and in September, 1913, under the commission form of government, was nominated from a list of forty-nine candidates as one of the eight men to be voted for at the ensuing election in November, he receiving the highest vote of all the candidates. He was elected on Nov. 4, 1913, again receiving the highest vote of the councilmanic candidates. At the present tirne (1914) he has charge of the finances of Allentown, with offices in the city hall.

Aschbach Family

History of Lehigh County Pennsylvania and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Its Families, Volume II
by Charles Rhoads Roberts, Rev. John Baer Stoudt, Rev. Thomas H. Krick, William J. Dietrich
Lehigh Valley Publishing Co., Ltd., Allentown, PA, 1914
Transcribed by Vicki Hartman; December 2011 for GenealogyTrails.com
In the Highlander, of May 17, 1842, published in Freiburg, Germany, appeared a biographical sketch of Gerhard Adolph Aschbach, the grandfather of Gerhard C. Aschbach, late of Allentown, Pa., and the subject of this article. The sketch came from the pen of his intimate friend, Hermann von Rotteck. From this we learn that Gerhard Adolph Aschbach was born at Hoechst on the Main, June 27, 1793. His father was the proprietor of a vermicelli factory, and a highly respected citizen of such culture and ability that he was the sole tutor of his son until the latter was fourteen years of age. Gerhard, ever cheerful and eager to learn, made rapid progress in his studies, and soon became the teacher of his younger brothers and sisters, especially of Joseph, who later became the well-known historian. When sixteen years old he was sent to the gymnasium at Idstein, where he so distinguished himself that he was allowed to skip two classes in the course.

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